ADVERTISEMENT

‘Poor implementation of primary health care responsible for 80% deaths in rural communities’

The Epidemiological Society of Nigeria (EPISON) has said that poor implementation of Primary Health Cares (PHCs) since after the establishment of National Primary Health Care Development Agency (NPHCDA) was responsible for about 80% deaths in rural communities across Nigeria.

The Society made the claim through Dr. Tolu Fakeye during the 8th Annual Scientific Conference of Epidemiological Society of Nigeria supported by the Partnership for Advocacy in Child and Family Health, PACFaH@Scale in Jos.

Dr Fakeye from National Hospital, Abuja, in his paper tagged: “A Scooping Mission on Primary Health Care Under One Roof in Nigeria,” also said when federal government introduced National Primary Health Care Development Agency (NPHCDA), implementation of PHCs was 82% but now, due to poor handling, less than 50% implementation is now being recorded.

He lamented that all the states in the country were facing shortage of skilled health personnel for the delivery of PHCs, which is leading to about 80% of deaths that occurred in most rural parts of Nigeria.

He said: “When primary health care started in Nigeria, many African countries did come to learn how the services are done, but due to poor implementation of policies, Nigerian performance declined.”

In his remarks, the Chairman of the Conference, Prof Micheal Asuzu recommended that for PHC to be better, there was a need to intensify advocacy to local government councils, training of PHCs workers and expansion of technical assistance to enhance capacity of the PHC workers.

He also called for increased funding for PHCs.

Download Daily Trust News App

Get it on Google Play
Share this article

Join us on


Join our whatsapp group here for Breaking News, Exclusives , others

Complain about a story or Report an error and/or correction: +2348189301900 (Whatsapp and SMS only) Email: dtonline@dailytrust.com

DISCLAIMER: Comments on this thread are that of the maker and they do not necessarily reflect the organizations stand or views on issues.