ADVERTISEMENT

Plan to silence call to prayer in Jerusalem mosques

The Islamic-Christian Council for Support of Al-Quds (Jerusalem) on Wednesday blasted the Israeli plan to prevent the call to prayer on the loudspeakers of mosques in Jerusalem and labelled it “a dangerous and racist crime and extremism against the holy places.”

The plan, pushed by new mayor of Jerusalem Moshe Lion, will reportedly see the city’s mosque loudspeakers replaced with new ones that broadcast at a lower volume, according to the Hadashot TV report.

ADVERTISEMENT

Police will be allowed to reduce the volume of the speakers deemed to be too loud, it said.

ADVERTISEMENT

But the council said in a statement that this move is the implementation of the controversial “Muezzin Law” and is “an attack on a holy thing in the city.” The “racist” plan may increase tension in the city of Al-Quds (Jerusalem), the council said.

Hanna Issa, the organization’s secretary-general, said that the denial of the sound of the call to prayer amounts to “racism” and “extremism” and coincides with the Israeli effort to change the Western, Islamic and Christian characteristics of Jerusalem into Jewish ones. (Arutz Sheva)

Dear Esteemed reader,

As part of our drive to keep improving the content of our newspaper, we are conducting a readership survey to enable us serve you better.

Kindly take two minutes of your time to fill in this questionnaire.

Thank you for your time. Click here to begin

Download Daily Trust News App

Get it on Google Play
Share this article

Dear Esteemed reader,

As part of our drive to keep improving the content of our newspaper, we are conducting a readership survey to enable us serve you better

Kindly take two minutes of your time to fill in this questionnaire.

Thank you for your time.

Join us on


Share your story with us: 08189301900 (Whatsapp and SMS only) Email: dtonline@dailytrust.com

Complain about a story or Report an error and/or correction: +2348189301900

DISCLAIMER: Comments on this thread are that of the maker and they do not necessarily reflect the organizations stand or views on issues.