ADVERTISEMENT

ILO urges FG, states to create decent jobs for youth

International Labour Organization (ILO)

The Director General of the International Labour Organisation (ILO), Guy Ryder has tasked the federal and state governments on creating decent job opportunities for the teeming youths in the country.

Ryder made this call during a news briefing on Friday at the ILO Country office in Abuja.

ADVERTISEMENT

Ryder noted that “the challenge of creating jobs for young Nigerians is very high on the National Policy Agenda” as it is around the continent of Africa and in the world.

Ryder said “there are over 255 million youth across the globe who are neither employed nor in training”.

While stressing the need to create decent working environment for youth, he said “in Africa, 95 per cent of young workers are in informal sector, which is an unprotected work. It is a vulnerable work which falls below the ILO standards”.

Ryder called for “micro economic policies, endowing young people with skills and education they need, labour market policies, youth entrepreneurship and rights of young people” as some of the ways to curb youth unemployment.

He said the ILO is committed to strengthening bilateral relationship with its Nigerian partners to mitigate the menace of unemployment.

 

OVER 5,000 NIGERIAN MEN HAVE OVERCOME POOR BEDROOM PERFORMANCE SYNDROME DUE TO THIS BRILLIANT DISCOVERY

Download Daily Trust News App

Get it on Google Play
Share this article

Dear Esteemed reader,

As part of our drive to keep improving the content of our newspaper, we are conducting a readership survey to enable us serve you better

Kindly take two minutes of your time to fill in this questionnaire.

Thank you for your time.

Join us on


Share your story with us: 08189301900 (Whatsapp and SMS only) Email: dtonline@dailytrust.com

Complain about a story or Report an error and/or correction: +2348189301900

DISCLAIMER: Comments on this thread are that of the maker and they do not necessarily reflect the organizations stand or views on issues.